The value of carrying to full term

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carrying to full term has numerous benefits

Premature birth is a serious and costly problem, according to the March of Dimes. They report that more than 500,000 babies are born too soon in the United States each year, costing the nation more than $26 billion annually.

Babies who survive an early birth often face lifelong health challenges, including cerebral palsy, blindness, hearing loss, learning disabilities, and other chronic conditions. Even infants born “late preterm” — between 34 and 36 weeks gestation — have a greater risk of re-hospitalization, breathing problems, feeding difficulties, temperature instability (hypothermia), jaundice, delayed brain development and learning problems.

Consider that:

A baby’s brain at 35 weeks weighs only two-thirds of what it will weigh at 39 to 40 weeks.

Nearly 29 percent of late pre-term infants have respiratory distress, compared with just 4.2 percent at term.

The average length of stay for a late pre-term infant is 5.9 days versus just 1.5 for infants at term.

75 percent of late pre-term babies are poor feeders compared to 28.6 percent of full-term babies.

Courtesy of Porter Regional Hospital

According to the March of Dimes, premature birth is a serious and costly problem. They report that more than a half million babies are born too soon in the United States each year, costing the nation more than $26 billion annually.

Babies who survive an early birth often face lifelong health challenges, including cerebral palsy, blindness, hearing loss, learning disabilities, and other chronic conditions. Even infants born “late preterm” — between 34 and 36 weeks gestation — have a greater risk of re-hospitalization, breathing problems, feeding difficulties, temperature instability (hypothermia), jaundice, delayed brain development and learning problems.

Consider that:

A baby’s brain at 35 weeks weighs only two-thirds of what it will weigh at 39 to 40 weeks.

Nearly 29 percent of late pre-term infants have respiratory distress, compared with just 4.2 percent at term.

The average length of stay for a late pre-term infant is 5.9 days versus just 1.5 for infants at term.

75 percent of late pre-term babies are poor feeders compared to 28.6 percent of full-term babies.