Be an ally; send a card

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BE AN ALLY. SEND A CARD.

Emily Belden, owner of an online card company called Happy Happy Gay Gay, started her company after she couldn’t find an appropriate congratulatory card for her recently married friend.

“Everything was bland and overtly heterosexual,” she said. “I believe that equal rights include everything from the right to marry to the right to have funny, creative greeting cards.”

“So, using my copywriting skills and teaming up with a graphic artist, I decided to make my own card,” Belden continued. “Before I knew it, Happy Happy Gay Gay was a fully functioning ecommerce store celebrating same-sex love, marriage and milestones.”

While vacationing in Mendocino, Calif., Belden’s friends, Paul Hamilton and Andrew Snyder, both of Chicago, woke up on June 26, 2013 and read that the Supreme Court handed down two rulings that bolstered same-sex marriage. The Supreme Court ruled that part of the Defense of Marriage Act (DOMA) was unconstitutional and allowed a lower court ruling to stand that struck down California’s Proposition 8 ballot initiative that defined marriage as between one man and one woman. That day, Hamilton and Snyder were engaged on a bluff overlooking the Pacific Ocean.

Two days later, on June 28, the couple drove to San Francisco for the weekend. They arrived within an hour of when the Attorney General ordered clerks to issue marriage licenses. They were married at San Francisco’s City Hall about 10 feet from a bronze statue of Harvey Milk, an American politician who became the first openly gay person to be elected to public office in California. CBS local and other media outlets covered their vows.

“It meant the beginning of equal protection under the law,” Snyder said. “I trusted Paul enough to jump in head first when the moment presented itself. It meant that we were the real thing, as real as anyone else’s real thing.”

Belden, true to form, sent a witty and supportive congratulations card.

By Wendy Altschuler, For Sun-Times Media

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Emily Belden, owner of an online card company called Happy Happy Gay Gay, started her company after she couldn’t find an appropriate congratulatory card for her recently married friend.

“Everything was bland and overtly heterosexual,” she said. “I believe that equal rights include everything from the right to marry to the right to have funny, creative greeting cards.”

“So, using my copywriting skills and teaming up with a graphic artist, I decided to make my own card,” Belden continued. “Before I knew it, Happy Happy Gay Gay was a fully functioning ecommerce store celebrating same-sex love, marriage and milestones.”

While vacationing in Mendocino, Calif., Belden’s friends, Paul Hamilton and Andrew Snyder, both of Chicago, woke up on June 26, 2013 and read that the Supreme Court handed down two rulings that bolstered same-sex marriage. The Supreme Court ruled that part of the Defense of Marriage Act (DOMA) was unconstitutional and allowed a lower court ruling to stand that struck down California’s Proposition 8 ballot initiative that defined marriage as between one man and one woman. That day, Hamilton and Snyder were engaged on a bluff overlooking the Pacific Ocean.

Two days later, on June 28, the couple drove to San Francisco for the weekend. They arrived within an hour of when the Attorney General ordered clerks to issue marriage licenses. They were married at San Francisco’s City Hall about 10 feet from a bronze statue of Harvey Milk, an American politician who became the first openly gay person to be elected to public office in California. CBS local and other media outlets covered their vows.

“It meant the beginning of equal protection under the law,” Snyder said. “I trusted Paul enough to jump in head first when the moment presented itself. It meant that we were the real thing, as real as anyone else’s real thing.”

Belden, true to form, sent a witty and supportive congratulations card.